pasture

Feed Hay Now to Allow Pastures to Recover

Feed hay in the fall and save the new green grass for winter is a plan that can result in more feed for drought-stressed cow herds. University of Missouri Extension specialists urge continued feeding of hay to allow pastures to rebuild root reserves to prepare grass for strong growth next spring.

“It’s tempting to turn cows onto new fall growth when rains return after a drought,” says Rob Kallenbach, MU forage specialist.

There’s another reason to hold off, says Justin Sexten, MU beef nutritionist. Cows will need high-quality grass when winter brings wet and cold weather. The grass growing this fall can be stockpiled in pastures for winter grazing.

Grow nature’s power plant and realize tremendous growth potential with Gamagrass

Do you want to solve your pasture productivity problems?  Gamagrass may be the solution you’ve been looking for.  It’s adaptability to a wide range of climates and soils (upland to bottom, sandy to clay) earn it a place in your operation.  The tremendous regrowth potential of gamagrass and consistently high forage quality provide the key to unlock your maximum pasture profits.

Eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides (L.)L.) is a native, perennial, warm-season bunchgrass.  This tall, robust grass has long been recognized as a highly productive forage grass of the eastern prairie with a photosynthetic rate that is among the highest reported in scientific literature for any species.

A Guide to Managing Pasture Water “Stabilized Stream and Pond Access Sites”

The Need to Manage Pasture Water

By properly managing your pasture water, you not only provide high-quality water to maintain the health and productivity of livestock on your farm, but you also contribute to maintaining the water quality downstream – water that is used for livestock and human consumption, as well as recreational activities like fishing and swimming.
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